Galley kitchen ideas: Projects that get this layout just right

When I think of a galley kitchen, I think of Victorian terraced houses. It’s a kitchen layout often found in this type of property and once, I lived in one complete with such a kitchen layout. The classic scenario is a long, narrow kitchen that leads to a downstairs bathroom or to the back garden. Know what I mean? Ok, great.

The galley kitchen gets a bit of a bad rep at times. Yes, it’s a layout usually found in smaller kitchens and it’s one where an island typically doesn’t really work, but there are great benefits to shout about, too.

First, it’s a super-practical layout. Preferred by many chefs and often the type of kitchen layout found in professional kitchens (picture a prep line set-up), the galley kitchen means everything is in easy reach and you can usually turn on your heel and access what’s behind you quickly and simply.

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Here you have the chance to differentiate functions on two sides of the room. For example, a sink area can be opposite the cooking zone, with plenty of prep space on both sides. You could even add a small peninsula onto a galley to create a useful serving area for hot dishes from the ovens and hob, close to the dining table. Or even a spot for your new home office.

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Admittedly, the galley kitchen is best for only one or two people at a time, so if you like big social gatherings in the kitchen, it probably isn’t the right layout for you. But this layout can be cleverly utilised to connect to other spaces such as a dining area or outdoors to give you a degree of separation and some of connection.

Want to see what I mean? Come hither…

This traditional-style galley kitchen boasts plenty of worktop space with butler sink and range cooker within easy reach, while all other appliances are hidden away behind integrated cabinetry for a calm and streamlined look. Burlanes Wellsdown kitchen painted in Farrow & Ball’s Vert De Terre. From £25,000. Photography: Sarah London Photographer
Running standard 600mm base cabinets down one side of a galley kitchen and narrower depth units on the other helps to maximise storage space without making the room feel too cluttered. Shown is Neptune’s Limehouse kitchen in Teal, starting from £8,000, with Keats double-arm wall lights, from £115 each.
This kitchen featuring Neptune cabinetry shows how a galley layout can connect to other living and dining areas and still link to the outdoors. It makes best use of a through-way in the Suffolk property.
In this kitchen by Ledbury Studio, the zones of the galley are cleverly differentiated through the use of different colours, adding interest to the overall kitchen. The layout flows through to the patio doors.
A larger kitchen, yes, but this is still a galley kitchen by definition. With a wider opening between two runs of units, there’s space for an island in the centre – effectively creating two galleys either side. Design by En Masse Bespoke.
On the smaller side, this single-run galley kitchen has everything you need to one side. Good for small kitchens, studios or open-plan living areas where you want the kitchen to look more like a ‘living’ scenario and less like a kitchen (per se!). This kitchen is by Roux Kitchens.
Classic in style, this wide galley kitchen with an island was designed by Searle & Taylor in Winchester. It leads out toward the back garden with plenty of walkway space left between units for good flow.
This double galley layout is packed with functionality, including a breakfast bar, cooking zone, built-in chopping board, and plenty of storage. Second Nature’s Milton kitchens, shown here in Alabaster.
Trend Interiors’ porcelain soft matt Slab door with urbantop burnt bronze worktop creates a warm, tactile feel in this galley kitchen. With sink and fridge-freezer to one side and the oven and prep space to the other, it’s a practical set-up.
Kitchens-International-renovate-a-small-kitchen
Designers at Kitchens International created a contemporary galley kitchen with Callerton Valencia units in high-gloss white. They incorporated a combination of full-height, base, and wall-hung cabinetry while retaining sufficient worktop space for the sink, hob, countertop appliances and preparation areas.
B&Q’s Stevia kitchen features grey shades for a clean and contemporary feel. The matt slab finish is practical too, as it will help hide fingerprints and imperfections, whilst creating an even finish from every angle. £1118 for a galley kitchen.

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