Compact retro-style kitchen in a south east London apartment

Pink compact kitchen Pluck main

If you asked me what my favourite kitchen design is, the answer is easy: a galley as you’d find in the Barbican, given a bit of a modern update (and with a little more space to move). It’s oddly specific, I know, and the original designs in those flats are very utilitarian, but I love a good bit of retro style.

So you can imagine how I instantly fell for John and Faye Parton’s soft pink scheme, which not only comes in a cool colour but also fits perfectly into its surroundings – after all, their south east London home was built just before the 60s began.

But before I waffle on – and believe me, I could – I’ll let them tell the story. They spoke to my colleague Michelle Perret, and told her all about how their scheme came together – swoon.

Pluck compact kitchen

John and Faye’s kitchen was custom made by Pluck to fit into the compact space and match the rest of their apartment. The pink colour is called Ruskin Blossom. For a similar pendant light, try Upscale Industrial.

Knowing they wanted an unusual colour, homeowners John and Faye Parton picked a pastel pink – or, as it is officially called, Ruskin Blossom – to create a bright and fun space for their compact kitchen redesign.

The couple moved into the flat in Gipsy Hill, south east London five years ago after being drawn to its beautiful design. Built in 1959, it still retained many original features and John and Faye patiently waited to redo the space for financial reasons.

“The property itself was in a poor state when we moved in and there were other jobs that needed doing more urgently – so it was a while before we had the money for a new kitchen,” John explains.

The small room’s previous design was cramped, with both a dark, fake wood veneer and marble worktop. To fit in with the rest of the apartment, it needed an improved layout and access to more natural light. Here, John explains how the project came together…

Pluck Knoll Court exterior

The couple live in a flat complex that was built in 1959.

What was the old scheme like?

The space is quite a small room and the old design felt like it tried to pack too much in. It was in an L-shape and very dark, due to lots of wall cabinets. The layout also meant you couldn’t get to the window.

The good thing about living in the flat for five years without touching it, however, was that Faye and I knew what would work. I had a clear idea, which was simply to open out the space and reduce the furniture, making it feel much brighter and less cluttered.

What was your vision for this compact kitchen?

We looked at some of the bigger chain suppliers when we decided to redo the kitchen, but were discouraged by the limited colour choices. We found Pluck, as they are in Brixton, not far away from us, and liked their philosophy of creating simple, clutter-free designs while using materials and colour in a nice way.

Pink Pluck kitchen

The compact kitchen benefits from a large window, which lets in plenty of light and helps make the space feel airy and open.

I told the designers we wanted to rework the L-shape layout, to open it up, and that wall cabinets weren’t an option as we’ve found they swallow up all the space. The kitchen is accessed from the living room, which has a dark mahogany parquet floor so the colour scheme had to work with this as well.

What was the thinking behind the layout and décor?

I wanted to keep the look as simple and bright as possible. That’s why there is only one run of lower cabinets and two simple open shelves at the top. Leaving the window clear also allows in so much more natural light.

The units were custom-made to be smaller than standard, to make the most of the compact kitchen. We also saved space by hollowing out a wall to create a full-height larder, which provides the perfect amount of storage – although we did have a small cull once the new kitchen was in.

It was suggested that perhaps we could open the space up, as this is usually the norm on a project this small. However, there are structural walls that can’t be removed so knocking through was not an option.

Pink Pluck kitchen appliances

For the appliances, John and Faye chose a hob and oven from Neff. They wanted something that was simple to use, but still offered quality and functionality.

But we wouldn’t have wanted to anyway – the sliding door between the kitchen and the living room is an original feature and means we can open up or separate the spaces to suit what we’re doing and who is in the flat. In terms of the décor, at the time Pluck had a palette of six colours but some would not have worked with the living space.

We chose Ruskin Blossom because it was the nicest – we wanted a strong or more unusual shade, but we certainly didn’t start the brief by saying we wanted pink. The same goes for the cabinet doors – it was our favourite design, as it makes for a simpler, more elegant look.

Recesses in lieu of door handles also reveal the plywood’s grain very nicely. For the appliances, we went to John Lewis & Partners and looked at the ovens. I found the brand Neff and went with them, as I thought they seemed to have a great balance between simplicity and functionality.

Compact pink kitchen

To create more storage, a wall was hollowed out and a larder unit fitted.

What do you like most about the finished design?

It feels like there is so much more space, even though it’s quite a compact kitchen – it is a much nicer room to be in and fits in with the rest of the flat and our aim of making everything feel much lighter.

It feels less claustrophobic but still completely meets our needs – small, but perfectly formed.

Featured image: John wanted the cabinetry, which is from Pluck, placed along one wall only. “How the kitchen should be was so clear to me,” he said. “Because I had spent years using the previously poor layout.” 

Photography: Malcolm Menzies

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