These are the best house plants for your kitchen

From having air purifying properties to uplifting our moods, house plants are ideal for refreshing your kitchen.

However, not all plants can survive in your kitchen, especially since temperature’s rising whenever there’s a new baking session on and it can also get really humid if you’re boiling vegetables or pasta.

But fear not, I’ve found ten house plants which absolutely love this environment and we’ve got some insight from plant expert and founder of Leaf Envy Beth Chapman.

“Plants love humidity, and each time you boil the kettle, cook your food or run the tap, your plants absorb the steam and thrive in this environment. Most kitchens are moderately light and airy as well, with good circulation that any kind of plant will adore,” says Beth. “When we think of the natural world, this makes us immediately think of riverbanks and forest floors, which is precisely what thrives in a kitchen environment.”

So, let’s take a look at the best house plants for your kitchen…

“You can really experiment with what works for you, but from funky ferns to captivating Calatheas, there’s plenty of options out there to breathe a breath of fresh air into your cooking station. Some of our recommendations for kitchen plants include the Boston Fern, Peace Lily and Satin Pothos,” Beth tells me.

The Boston fern
Happy with minimal sunlight and temperatures between 18º-25ºC, the non-toxic Boston fern will thrive on your kitchen shelf. Pop it next to your colourful condiments or beside your coffee station to enjoy its evergreen foliage. Plus, it only needs the occasional mist and water only when the two top inches of the soil get dry.
Boston ferns love bright and indirect light, but keep in mind that too much shade can result in sparse fronds. Bertie plant in ceramic glazed pot, £8, Patch.
The Blue Star fern
Also known as the sword fern, this funky house plant is easily adaptable to low and medium sunlight, and loves humidity too! When the fronds start to turn brown, that’s your first sign you’ve probably been neglecting it for a while by either not watering it enough or keeping it in too much light. To make sure you enjoy its beauty for as long as possible, water it weekly.
The best house plant for your kitchen
Pro tip: This type of fern likes to keep its leaves dry, so make sure you don’t get the leaves wet when watering it. Blue Star fern with planter, £25, Lazy Flora.
The Zanzibar Gem
If you are beginning your house plant parent journey and are afraid of killing your newly adopted additions, then then this plant is perfect for you! It can go weeks (maybe even months) without water and can survive in darker interiors too. Its branches feature shiny green leaves and is ideal for bringing a touch of the outdoors in your kitchen.
House plant novice? Go for the Zamioculcas in grey pot, £18.50, The Little Botanical.
Satin Pothos
Heart-shaped leaves, satin finish and white specks, this stylish plant is easy to care for – just keep it out of direct sunlight and don’t overwater it. Plant it in decorative pots to match your kitchen aesthetic, or choose hanging baskets made from natural textures to achieve that bohemian look.
Place your house plant on a mantel and let it trail freely. Satin Pothos, £14, Bloombox Club.
Chinese evergreen
Style your open shelving with the vibrant pink, red and green Aglaonema plant. Its bold foliage will stand-out and give your space a fresh look. All it needs is bright to medium indirect light and water every other week. Don’t forget to wipe its leaves from time to time as they tend to get dusty.
Add a pop of colour to your scheme with the Red Aglaonema in KINTO plant pot in blue and grey, £48, Elephant & Cactus.
Calathea Ornata
The pink and green stripy plant loves humid interiors like kitchens and bathrooms. To care for it, keep it out of direct sunlight as it will damage the leaves and make the beautiful shades fade away. Give it a good mist and wipe the leaves to keep it looking fresh at all times.
Best house plants for kitchen
This plant would look great popped on your worktop or next to your kitchen island. Calathea Ornata (19cm), £27, Bloombox Club.
The Kentia palm
Bring the outdoors in and get that tropical feeling with the Kentia palm. Either plant it in a statement clay pot, or place it on top of a wooden stool next to a window to create a grand feature. The good news is it only needs light watering and medium light. Plus, it likes high humidity so it will be perfect for your kitchen!
Create an exotic scheme with the Big Ken (120-130cm), no decorative pot, £70, Patch.
Golden Pothos
This fast-growing trailing plant is happy in room temperatures between 10-24°C, but prefers high humidity spaces. It will look great on top of a shelf in between cookbooks, or planted in a hanging pot where you can admire its glossy green leaves with subtle cream and yellow spots.
Best house plants for kitchen
This Epipremnum aureum – Golden Pothos (20 x 40cm), £22.99, from Hortology, tolerates lower light environments too.
The Peace Lily
This sophisticated and air-purifying plant with green leaves and white flowers prefers high humidity environments and indirect light. Get into the routine of watering your Peace Lily as it loves water! If it is happy with the location and has plenty to drink, it should bloom throughout spring.
House plants for bathroom
Create a centrepiece for your dining table or kitchen island with this glamorous house plant. Moyses Stevens Peace Lily potted plant 40cm, £25, Selfridges.
Succulents
Attention plant lovers who lack those green fingers – I’ve got you covered too! Succulents will become your best friends. Why? Well, they only need a nice spot with bright, indirect light, a small amount of water (you can even water them when the soil is completely dry and they won’t be upset with you), and a good temperature to thrive. After all, they are some of the hardest house plants to kill.
Best house plants for kitchen
Work on your plant parent skills with the beginner-friendly extra large Echeveria succulent, £18.99, Beards & Daisies.

Featured image: iStock/ NeonShot

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